Education

New book to be launched on Inch Wildfowl Reserve

Eamonn McFadden

Reporter:

Eamonn McFadden

Email:

eamonn.mcfadden@donegaldemocrat.com

New book to be launched on Inch Wildfowl Reserve

The cover of the new children's book.

An new book on the wildlife of one Donegal’s most important ecological areas, the Inch Wildfowl Reserve, on the shores of Lough Swilly, will be launched this weekend.
The site is recognised as one of the most important sites in the country for wintering ducks, geese and swans.
In recent years over 13,000 wildfowl have been monitored using the site during the winter period with over 100 different species recorded to date.
The number of birds using the site over winter has increased with the sites development due to increased site management. The opening of the site to the public has also been a huge success and Inch Wildfowl Reserve now welcomes over 120,000 visitors each year.
The new book project was led by Education Staff from Glenveagh National Park, who had previous experience and over 10 years' expertise in designing and creating resources for schools and families.
Along with the Conservation Ranger at Inch, and support by the Inch Wildfowl Reserve Trust, the education guides ran a number of schools visits to the site and gathered ideas from local children on what they’d like to see go into a book.
The project outline was to create an educational resource for children and schools that would help communicate and interpret the story of the landscape of Inch and the important bird life there.
Eadain Madigan, who has contributed to other National park publications, was brought on board to create the stunning art works in the book. The book was a work in progress throughout 2016, bring together local and expert knowledge of a variety of people and the vision for illustrations came about as each new section of text was written.
It was agreed to tell the story of 6 key species of bird present at Inch, along with interesting aspects of the site, its history, conservation work and activities for children to complete. In 2001 National Parks and Wildlife Services entered into a 30 year lease of Inch Lough and the surrounding wet grasslands.