Eunan boxing clever for Guinness Book of Records attempt

Twin Towns Boxing Club's coach Eunan Devenney is on the look-out to reclaim his world record in the punchbag marathon with his target to last over 36 successive hours.

Twin Towns Boxing Club's coach Eunan Devenney is on the look-out to reclaim his world record in the punchbag marathon with his target to last over 36 successive hours.

The Ballybofey native has been in training since last June for the event, which will take place in May, to take the record back that he initially set in 2001 when he clocked 24 hours and 16 minutes, thus giving the 42-year-old a place in the Guinness Book of Records.

However, three years later, Californian-based Ron Sarchian took Devenney's record with a time of 36 hours and three minutes and that is the mark the HSE employee at St Joseph's Hospital in Stranorlar will pit himself against. All monies raised in the lead-up to the event will be divided between the Twin Towns Boxing Club and Our Lady's Hospital for Sick Children in Crumlin.

"I set the record initially as nobody had done something like this before so it was unique in that sense," 42-year-old Devenney said yesterday. "But I then learned that Ron broke the record on the States so I decided that I would like to give it another crack. I had planned to do it in 2008 but a few niggly injuries held me up, but I'm really going to give it a crack this time.

"A friend of mine, Donal Sweeney from Stranorlar, collects money for Our Lady's Hospital and the other passion of my life is the Twin Towns club, so if I can help the two of them in any way it would be great. Both are important in their own way and help young people and I have no problem punching a bag for 36 hours or whatever when you consider the situation these young children find themselves in. I'm glad to help.

Devenney has since been in contact with Sarchian, a stuntman and actor, who appeared as a hit man on long-running American soap opera 'General Hospital.' He also used the marathon in 2004 to raise money for charity - in his case the Lance Armstrong Foundation, named for the cyclist who survived testicular cancer to win the Tour de France seven times.

"I sent him an email to tell him I am going to have a go at beating the record but have yet to hear back from him," Devenney said. "It will certainly be a gruelling task, but it's one I think I am ready for.

"Training for something like this takes in a few different things like light weights, shadow boxing, jogging, skipping and cycling, but endurance is the most important element. I'm someone who is well used to training up to three times a day so I'm not afraid of it."

Devenney's marathon will start at 10am on Thursday, May 26, at Twin Towns Boxing club. It is expected that more than 100,000 punches on the 100lb bag will be required by the father-of-three to reclaim his record.