Donegal did all that was required to beat Down

Alan Foley

Reporter:

Alan Foley

Donegal did all that was required to beat Down
So, after a brief interlude after winning the All-Ireland, Donegal have retained their status as the most controversial team to play football.

So, after a brief interlude after winning the All-Ireland, Donegal have retained their status as the most controversial team to play football.

It was far from a flawless performance but some of the criticism was unwarranted.

Three years ago on the last weekend in June, Donegal had become the first team knocked out of the championship. Down, on the other hand, were progressing to the All-Ireland final.

Of all the northern teams, Down have always been the most flamboyant and likeable. James McCartan has had to evolve after seeing that panel from 2010 decimated.

Only seven that lost to Cork played on Sunday. With Niall Moyna now on board, Down weren’t so stereotypical. When they won successive All-Ireland titles in the early 1960s they didn’t do it with two sweepers.

But football has evolved and without Karl Lacey and Neil Gallagher from the start, and Ryan Bradley andFrank McGlynn during, Jim McGuinness’s side did too.

To suggest Donegal’s performance wouldn’t have beaten Cork, Mayo, Kerry or Dublin is an unfair.

When Mo Farah won the 5,000 and 10,000 metres at the Olympics was it suggested he didn’t run well enough to win the 400 metres?

No, it wasn’t. Donegal played and beat the situation they found themselves in. They got over the line and that’s all that counts.