Letterkenny to remain an open area for GAA after DRA rule against Letterkenny Gaels appeal

Letterkenny to remain an open area for GAA after DRA rule against Letterkenny Gaels appeal
Letterkenny is to remain an open area for GAA purpose after a Letterkenny Gaels’ appeal to the GAA’s Disputes Resolution Authority has failed.

Letterkenny is to remain an open area for GAA purpose after a Letterkenny Gaels’ appeal to the GAA’s Disputes Resolution Authority has failed.

Letterkenny Gaels appealed to the DRA against the decision of the Ulster Council which had overturned a decision of the Donegal county committee to divide Letterkenny along parish lines.

The Donegal decision meant that the parish of Conwal and Leck was the designated St. Eunan’s club area with the parish of Aughaninshin designated to Letterkenny Gaels.

The DRA decision has been understandably met with mixed reaction by both clubs with Letterkenny Gaels expressing their disappointment at the decision which they received by email on Tuesday afternoon.

“Naturally we are very disappointed with the decision. We are going to reflect on it and take some time to consider and we will not be making any further comment on the decision until we examine the judgement in detail,” a club spokesperson told the Democrat.

Meanwhile, the decision has been welcomed by St. Eunan’s. In a statement issued yesterday morning (Wednesday) by the club, PRO Paul McGovern stated the decision had confirmed the situation that has existed since the formation of Letterkenny Gaels remains in place.

“This means that anyone living within our shared catchment area is free to apply to join either club.

“We hope that this matter can now be put behind us and we look forward to working with all GAA people in our shared catchment area to advance the aims of the Association.”

The DRA decision brings to an end a long running saga that has been extremely divisive in Letterkenny. And while the DRA is the last avenue of appeal through GAA channels, it remains to be seen if this is the last of the thorny issue.

The Ulster Council ruled against the Donegal county committee because when the decision was taken it did not have a two thirds majority. The motion had been passed on a simple majority.