Gaeltacht ‘human chain’ this Sunday to benefit Relay for Life

A group in Cloughaneely is planning to link Gortahork and neighbouring Falcarragh this weekend with a human chain that will benefit the upcoming Relay for Life Donegal.

A group in Cloughaneely is planning to link Gortahork and neighbouring Falcarragh this weekend with a human chain that will benefit the upcoming Relay for Life Donegal.

Chain for Life will take place at 2pm, Easter Sunday, April 8th, with registration at the churches in Gortahork and Falcarragh. There’s no set fee for taking part, “just everyone puts in a donation,” said Carmel Ferry of the Chain for Life committee. “It’s for everybody.”

Formation of the human chain will be followed by a family fun day in Gortahork.

Proceeds will go to Relay for Life Donegal, the 24-hour charity walk being held to benefit the Irish Cancer Society.

Frances Curran and her sisters, Agnes, Brid and Anne, came up with the Chain for Life idea, said Carmel Ferry who, with Brid, are the group’s treasurers. She said they wanted to support Relay for Life because so many people in Donegal have been affected by cancer.

Relay for Life is the 24-hour charity walk to benefit the Irish Cancer Society, on May 26th-27th at the Letterkenny Institute of Technology.

Participants in the Chain for Life will receive a number when they register, “just like in the 10K walks”, Carmel said. The group estimated they will need about 2,000 people to link one village to the other.

“We’re not panicking yet,” Carmel said. Then she added, “We are starting to panic but,” and broke into a laugh.

Gardaí will put a one-way system in place between Gortahork and Falcarragh for the Chain of Life, which will probably take 90 minutes to two hours in all, Carmel said. There will be buses at the registration point to bring participants into the centre of the chain.

The family fun day afterwards will be held in the Teach an Ceoil in Gortahork, with refreshments, entertainment by local artists and guests including the Easter Bunny and Big Bird and maybe even a bear on a bicycle.

Carmel said the point of the day was to involve as many people as possible, families and people of all ages, and to raise money for the Irish Cancer Society.

“It does affect us all,” Carmel said. “We all have had cancer come to the door or near enough.”