Cross-border fuel laundering could be stamped out

Michelle NicPhaidin

Reporter:

Michelle NicPhaidin

Cross-border fuel laundering could be stamped out
Cross-border efforts and strict new supply chain rules could successfully eliminate illegal fuel laundering, according to Jim Higgins MEP. The MEP, who is a member of the European Parliament’s Committee on Transport claims that effective cross-border cooperation and a new fuel marker system will help stamp out fuel laundering.

Cross-border efforts and strict new supply chain rules could successfully eliminate illegal fuel laundering, according to Jim Higgins MEP. The MEP, who is a member of the European Parliament’s Committee on Transport claims that effective cross-border cooperation and a new fuel marker system will help stamp out fuel laundering.

“Authorities are working together on a cross-border basis in order to effectively wipe out fuel laundering. In addition to new licensing conditions, new rules introduced this year mean all licensed fuel traders are now required to make electronic returns to Revenue detailing their monthly fuel transactions. Analysis of these monthly returns will enable Revenue to identify suspicious transactions and patterns distribution,” he said.

He said that any suspicious activity should be investigated.

“Traders guilty of any wrong doing could lose their license; face a tax assessment and prosecution,” he said.

He added that tougher supply chain controls will make it difficult for fuel criminals to source marked fuel for laundering and to get laundered fuel onto the market.

“Measures to crack down on fuel laundering have led to significant results. In the past two years, 97 filling stations throughout the State were closed for breaches of licensing conditions. Since 2010, 2.8 million litres of fuel have been seized,” he warned.