Letterkenny Women’s Centre joins anti-prostitution campaign

The Letterkenny Women’s Centre has joined the Turn Off the Red Light campaign, a campaign to end prostitution and sex trafficking in Ireland.

The Letterkenny Women’s Centre has joined the Turn Off the Red Light campaign, a campaign to end prostitution and sex trafficking in Ireland.

The campaign believes the best way to combat the problem is to address the demand for prostitution by criminalising the purchase of sex.

Campaigners have been lobbying the government to introduce legislation to end the exploitation of women, men and children in the sex industry.

“We are joining the Turn Off the Red Light campaign at a crucial time as TDs and senators continue a review of the current laws on prostitution, and are adding our voice to the many across the county who want local politicians to stand up to pimps,” said Roisín Kavanagh, chairperson of the Letterkenny Women’s Centre.

She said, “With 1,000 women and girls placed for sale on the internet in Ireland everyday, and pimps bringing their organised crime to every county, including Donegal, it is important that we now send a message to our lawmakers that the time for action has arrived.”

The centre chairperson said the group is “proud to stand with trade unionists, businesspeople, doctors and nurses, representatives of the farming community, public servants, survivors of prostitution and many others throughout Donegal who are seeking new laws.

“As a border county our communities are particularly vulnerable to pimps and traffickers as they move their criminal activity back and forth to avoid detection,” Roisín said. “It is time to ensure that Donegal is no longer a soft target for these crimes.”

Denise Charlton, chief executive of the Immigrant Council of Ireland, also encouraged Donegal people who want changes in the law to visit the web site, www.turnofftheredlight.ie/action. The web link facilitates visitors in sending emails supporting the Turn Off the Red Light campaign to their Oireachtas representatives.

“It is now vital that people in Donegal who want legal change use this opportunity to have their voices heard,” Denise said.