Dead eagle not poisoned locally

An eagle that was found poisoned in the heart of the Blue Stack Mountains was not thought to have been killed by local farmers according to Lorcan O’Toole of the Golden Eagle Trust. The National Parks and Wildlife Service are investigating the killings of White Tailed Eagles in Donegal and Mayo. Post Mortem results from an eagle, found dead recently at Croaghubrid in the Blue Stack mountains in April have revealed that it had been poisoned.

An eagle that was found poisoned in the heart of the Blue Stack Mountains was not thought to have been killed by local farmers according to Lorcan O’Toole of the Golden Eagle Trust. The National Parks and Wildlife Service are investigating the killings of White Tailed Eagles in Donegal and Mayo. Post Mortem results from an eagle, found dead recently at Croaghubrid in the Blue Stack mountains in April have revealed that it had been poisoned.

Lorcan O’Toole said: “I would like to stress that all farmers in the area are very supportive. I do not think that they are responsible for the death of the eagle. Both White Tailed Eagles and Golden Eagles are prone to this type of poisoning as they are scavengers.”

Minister Jimmy Deenihan condemned the poisoning of the birds. The Minister said: “The satellite tracking shows that these birds had been wandering over hundreds of coastal, hill and lowland farms in recent months unmolested and without concern.

“I understand that landowners in Mayo were actively sending in regular sightings to the project manager/team. I am, therefore, very disappointed that some unknown individuals would wantonly try to kill these magnificent birds.”

A young Mayo eagle, which had been released in Killarney National Park in 2010, was carrying a satellite tag to track its movements, and when the tag showed the bird was not moving about, a search was carried out by National Parks and Wildlife Service staff and the Golden Eagle Trust. The dead bird was found on the shores of Lough Beltra in County Mayo.

Post Mortem results showed that not only had the eagle got high concentrations of poison in its body, but it had also been shot at some time in the past, and had shotgun pellets in its body. It is not clear whether the shooting and poisoning were related incidents.

Minister Deenihan urged that anyone with information about the matter should contact the local Garda Siochána or the National Parks and Wildlife Service on 095-41054.