Major tragedy averted

Matt Britton

Reporter:

Matt Britton

The Mayor of Bundoran has said that a major tragedy has been averted in the resort town after a family of four were admitted to hospital suffering from carbon monoxide poisoning.

The Mayor of Bundoran has said that a major tragedy has been averted in the resort town after a family of four were admitted to hospital suffering from carbon monoxide poisoning.

Cllr. Michael McMahon told the Donegal Democrat, “We are all regrettably too familiar with the recent tragedy in Sligo where three members of a family were found dead in their home as a result of carbon monoxide poisoning.

“Fortunately in Bundoran we are talking about four survivors and not four more victims but this incident must serve as a warning to everybody about the dangers of carbon monoxide - it can be a silent killer.

“I am very familiar with Cluid development at Silverhill.

“These houses are relatively new having been built back in 2004 and recently had the very best of Stanley solid fuel stoves installed and the insulation increased.

“Initially there were problems with the heating costs in the houses where residents were experiencing extremely high bills averaging in some cases up to €500/600 per billing period. The solid fuel option was obviously considered a much more economic option.

“I am calling on Cluid to carry out a thorough investigation into why this has happened and what actually caused it. This couple and their two children have been exceptionally lucky and hopefully we can learn from what has happened here and ensure that it does not happen again.”

Michael Concannon, Regional Director of Cluid Housing Association said that they are currently carrying out an investigation into what exactly caused the poisoning.

He said, “The diagnosis of carbon monoxide poisoning was confirmed after all members of the family complained of dizziness and light headed - ness. They sought medical attention and told us what happened.

“We have installed carbon monoxide detectors in all of the houses and are carrying out with the solid fuel and gas appliances in the house as well as looking at the airflow.”

Following the tragedy in Sligo in December the mandatory installation of carbon monoxide alarms is to be addressed by new building regulations being drafted by the Dept. of Environment.

The National Standards Authority of Ireland has warned however, “ We don’t want people to think that if they put in an alarm that they’re safe and that they don’t need to get their boiler serviced or their chimney swept. These are of equal importance in ensuring safety at home.”

The family involved in the incident have preferred not to comment on the situation.