Police heartened by murder appeal

Sue Doherty

Reporter:

Sue Doherty

Police in Glasgow say they’ve been very heartened by the response to their appeal for information following the murder of 57-year-old William McKeeney from Malin Head in the city last Sunday.

Police in Glasgow say they’ve been very heartened by the response to their appeal for information following the murder of 57-year-old William McKeeney from Malin Head in the city last Sunday.

A spokesperson for Strathclyde Police told the Donegal Democrat yesterday: “There was a strong response to our media conference on Monday and investigators are following a number of lines of enquiry. We were very pleased at the number of people who came forward with information.”

Chief Inspector David Gailey said: “I believe there are members of the community in Pollokshields who can help us take this investigation forward and give us an understanding of who is responsible for this crime. I am absolutely determined that we identify the persons responsible for this crime and effect an arrest at the earliest opportunity.”

Police are looking for two Asian men in their early 20s. No arrests had been made as of the time of going to press.

Chief Inspector Gailey said Mr McKeeney was the victim of a “sustained and violent” assault that appeared to have had no motive. Mr McKeeney, the policeman added: “went out of his way to assist a number of members of the community on a day-to-day basis. He had absolutely no enemies that we know of.”

Mr McKeeney’s partner Annemarie (48) witnessed the attack from the couple’s flat and police said she was “completely traumatised”.

Cllr. Mickey Doherty, a long-standing friend of the deceased, told the Democrat: “I’ve known William for 30 years. People very often don’t appreciate someone until after they die but that was certainly not the case with William. He was an extremely well-liked man and his death is a terrible blow for the people of Malin Head as well as for his partner Annemarie and his family.

“William was always the first to help anyone out. If he was out driving his lorry and saw someone pulled over at the side of the road with the bonnet up, he would always stop and help. He’d have a cheery, friendly word for everyone he met.

“He was the first driver who brought goods out to the Romanian orphanage for us away back in 1998. He did it on a voluntary basis, like so much other work he did for the local community here in Donegal. He was also a great lover of traditional music and a big fan of the Henry Girls.”

Another close friend, Moore Armstrong added: “William and I knew each other for years. We talked on the phone every week after he moved to Glasgow. To be honest, I’m still in shreds when I think about what happened to him. You would need to have known the man to appreciate what his death means to people.”

It is understood that Mr McKinney’s remains will be brought home to Malin Head but arrangements are not yet in place.