Murder accused had been barred from home

The murder trial of a man who has admitted killing a teenager in a bar on Arranmore Island has heard evidence from his then wife that he had been subject of a barring order preventing him from entering their home.

The murder trial of a man who has admitted killing a teenager in a bar on Arranmore Island has heard evidence from his then wife that he had been subject of a barring order preventing him from entering their home.

Stephen Boyle (41) has admitted killing but denies murdering Paul Boyle (19) at Early’s Bar, Leabgarrow, Arranmore on October 3, 2009.

Mr Boyle of Austen House, Cambridge Road, Kilburn Park in London has pleaded not guilty of murder but guilty of manslaughter at the Central Criminal Court.

Sinead McCauley told Mr Paul O Higgins SC prosecuting she had been separated from her husband for a number of years and that he was had been the subject of a barring order preventing him from entering their home. She that said on the night of the incident, he came to the house at 3am. She heard a bang on the window and she saw he was covered in blood. Ms McCauley said he told her he had been beaten up and that he hurt somebody and kept shouting abuse at her.

She told Mr Michael O Higgins SC defending under cross-examination that she and Stephen met in the 1990s and married in August 1999. Ms McCauley agreed he had built a house on a site, which was provided by Stephen Boyles mother and said under legal advice she sought 150,000 euro for her share in the home. She agreed her husband was in England working for 12 days out of 14 but said they originally lived there together and that their child was born there.

Ms McCauley agreed that she had a number of other relationships but told the court: “The reason our marriage fell apart was because of his drinking.”

She added: “Stephen told me he had relationships in England himself.”

She also agreed that there was an attempt to reconcile the marriage in 2008 saying: “We had a conversation”. She agreed that, between 2001 and 2006, there were periods when she and her husband were intimate.

Sergeant Edward Griffin told Mr Vincent Heneghan BL prosecuting 25 people were present when gardai arrived from the mainland at Early’s Bar. He said the accused’s brother arrived to the bar and told him where Stephen Boyle was.

He said the accused was not fully clothed when they arrived at the house and he was given the legal caution when he was arrested at 5.25am for an alleged assault in Early’s Bar.

Stephen Boyle told gardaí: “I didnt mean to hit anyone”. He was then interviewed in the garda station, the court was told.

Sgt Griffin said he was advised that Paul Boyle had died before he informed the coroner and he took Stephen Boyle to Letterkenny Hospital for treatment.

He said when he informed Stephen Boyle that Paul Boyle had died he started crying. He was then cautioned but he had nothing to say.

Under cross-examination by Mr Michael O Higgins, he said the accused had injuries to his face and at no time ever spoke.

Sgt Griffin said the accused was hospitalised and remained in Letterkenny Hospital until the following Tuesday.

It was also put to Sgt Griffin in cross-examination that the accused was suicidal but he said: “He complained about feeling unwell”.

The trial continues before a jury of six men and six women presided over by Mr Justice Patrick McCarthy.