New Irish web resource includes Donegal recordings

Three hundred Irish-language audio and video recordings, including recordings made in Donegal, are now available to the public through a new Irish resource on the internet that was launched yesterday.

Three hundred Irish-language audio and video recordings, including recordings made in Donegal, are now available to the public through a new Irish resource on the internet that was launched yesterday.

The materials date back to 1972 across a range of subjects, said Séamas Ó Concheanainn, project manager for the iTunes U-COGG Channel and administrator of the Acadamh na hOllscolaíochta Gaeilge, NUI Galway, centre in Carna, Co. Galway.

Through the web site, the recorded materials “are now being brought back to the communities that the material originated in,” Séamas said. “That’s important because there has been a train of thought traditionally that a lot of the folklore and culture collected was removed from the communities where it was collected.”

He said that now, with new technology and the partnership between the organisations behind the project, Séamas said, “we’re able to address that”.

Among the available recordings of Donegal people is a conversation among children from Gaeltacht areas in Donegal, Kerry and Connemara, “about everything young children are interested in,” Séamas said. The recording was made in the 1980s.

The channel includes audio and video selected from the RTÉ Raidió na Gaeltachta and NUI Galway archives as part of a research project undertaken by Acadamh na hOllscolaíochta Gaeilge, which has a centre in Gaoth Dobhair as well as Carna. The iTunes U-COGG Channel was launched in Carna yesterday afternoon by Edel Ní Chuireáin, head of RTÉ Raidió na Gaeltachta.

The iTunes U - COGG Channel was developed by Acadamh na hOllscolaíochta Gaeilge, NUI Galway, for Gaeltacht and all-Irish primary schools. In 2009, An Chomhairle um Oideachas Gaeltachta and Gaelscolíaochta (COGG) was granted a license from Apple to manage and distribute educational resources for Gaeltacht and all-Irish primary schools and COGG commissioned Acadamh to research the potential of using the iTunes U platform to deliver the Irish-language resources.

The channel is available free on line at the Cogg web site, http://www.cogg.ie, as is the download of any software necessary to access the materials.

The project targets fifth and sixth class at the primary school level, but Séamas said there are resources on the channel that are suitable for second level as well. A learning plan has also been developed to accompany the channel, “so that teachers can utilise the resources in the classroom,” Séamas said. He said the resources can be used for teaching Irish, for enriching one’s knowledge of Irish and to supplement the teaching of other subjects through Irish.

“The resources are very suitable to adult learners, too,” he said.