Coffee morning for hospice

Coffee morning for hospice
People across Donegal and the country are being asked to have a coffee next month, to raise funds for local hospice services.

People across Donegal and the country are being asked to have a coffee next month, to raise funds for local hospice services.

People in workplaces, homes and local groups are being asked to hold a coffee morning on Thursday, Sept. 18th, and collect €2 for each cup of Bewley’s coffee consumed. Called “Ireland’s Biggest Coffee Morning”, the event has raised around 30 million euro for hospice care nationwide in the 22 years since it began.

All money raised locally goes to local hospice services.

“Although a palliative home care service has been provided in County Donegal since 1989, the hospice itself was opened in February 2003 and since then the services have been in great demand from people throughout the county,” Dr James McDaid, president of Donegal Hospice, said.

He said the service has introduced Hospice Day Care to provide shorter periods of palliative care. Volunteers continue to provide complimentary therapies to short-term and long-term residents, and the addition of two sisters to the homecare team brings to seven the number of nursing sisters.

At the Donegal Hospice purpose-built facility in Knocknamona, Letterkenny, Dr. McDaid said a multidisciplinary team support medical and nursing staff in providing palliative care to the residents of its six bedrooms and two apartments.

Bernadette McGarvey, community relations manager, North West Hospice, said North West provides specialist care with compassion for those living with life-limiting illness in Sligo, Leitrim, south Donegal and west Cavan. She said their service is provided through the in-patient unit, and Community Palliative Care Team and Hospital Support Team.

Established in 1998, North West Hospice serve a catchment area of about 110,000 people. In 2013 their community team cared for 333 patients over 2,755 visits, and they recorded 245 in-patient admissions and 597 patients seen by the hospital support team over 4,364 visits.