Ragtime blues comes to Letterkenny Town Park

Bringing what’s been called the sound of “Delta-meets-Appalachia”, Pokey LaFarge and the South City Three will play two shows during the Earagail Arts Festival, in only their second visit to Ireland.

Bringing what’s been called the sound of “Delta-meets-Appalachia”, Pokey LaFarge and the South City Three will play two shows during the Earagail Arts Festival, in only their second visit to Ireland.

Playing old-time blues from the American heartland, Pokey and the band have been selling out shows wherever they’ve played on this tour.

Pokey LaFarge and The South City Three will play at 9pm, Saturday, July 9, as part of the Earagail Arts Festival Feast of the Senses in Letterkenny Town Park; and at 8pm, Sunday, July 10, at McGrory’s in Culdaff.

This is the festival’s first-ever Feast of the Senses, a night of cabaret and cuisine with music, dance, theatre and supper under one roof in the Festival Marquee. The €35 ticket includes night-time performances by Ponydance and Pokey and the South City Three in an evening hosted by Little John Nee; as well as a three-course supper created by festival food partners Rathmullan House.

Pokey LaFarge and the South City Three, all Missouri men, were recently signed to Jack White’s label, Third Man Records, which surprised even the band member themselves.

Surprised

“I think a lot of people were surprised about it, even us,” said Pokey, who hails from St. Louis. “But they said, ‘You really should work with Jack’, and we may be by far the most ‘old time’ group on his label.”

“But Jack has released a bit of everything on his vinyl label and it’s pretty cool to have a 45 with our songs Chittlin’ Cookin’ Time in Cheatham County/Pack It Up released,” he said.

Pokey said it was nice to be part of a group of artists still playing ragtime blues.

“Our style of music has never died since it started,” he said. “People have always been playing it where we are from, and it’s so important that it’s continued.

“That’s why it’s nice that our peers and us get the opportunity to come to places like Ireland and play it,” he said.